Columns/Opinions

Tue
24
Feb

Washita County Museum News

By Landon Jones

This week we continue on with the oral history of the Cheyenne tribe as told to John Seger in 1905. We are reprinting it exactly as published by John Seger. There was another tribe of Indians that used to fight with them and attack them when they crossed each other’s paths. This tribe would steal the children of the Cheyenne’s and their women also, and keep possession of them.

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Tue
24
Feb

The Feud Heats Up

Before a month had passed following the murder of Doctor Pierce, two men attempted to waylay Bob Lee at his own house. The McKinney Enquirer related the happening. “We learn that a few days since, two men called at the house of Bob Lee in the eastern part of the county, and after firing at him several times, made their escape, thinking probably they had killed him. Lee, however, was not hurt. His brother arrived a little time after, when the two traced the would-be assassins to Farmersville, and attacked them, killing one and wounding the other. We did not learn the names of the parties or any of the particulars.”

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Wed
18
Feb

THE LEE-PEACOCK FEUD

Bob Lee had come to Texas in the 1830s with his parents who settled on the line between Hunt and Fannin counties in northern Texas. With the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Army of the Confederacy and was made a captain in General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s band of raiders. After the war, he rode proudly home to Texas, but immediately found himself to be a marked man.

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Wed
18
Feb

Washita County Museum News

This week we will continue on with the history of the Cheyenne tribe, told as their oral history, as recorded and published by John Seger. The punctuation and spelling in the story are the same as Seger printed them. The tradition of the Cheyennes as told to John H. Seger in the year of 1905, by one who was appointed to keep the tradition.

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Tue
10
Feb

House Report

By Todd Russ
 
Recently Governor Mary Fallin delivered the annual State of the State Address in front of a joint session of the Oklahoma Legislature. The governor proposed adopting performance informed budgeting that links spending to measurable goals and outcomes, and requiring an evaluation process of every tax credit.
 
Tue
10
Feb

A Word From The Superintendent

By Brad Overton
 
Extracurricular as well cocurricular activities are an integral part of the overall education of a student. Cordell Schools offers a variety of both of these types of programs. I would like to discuss a few of these programs in my article this week.
 
Tue
03
Feb

House Report

By State Representative Todd Russ

 

Lately, there have been some people who would like to make me out to be some kind of overbearing government figure. Nothing could be further from the truth. My House Bill 1125 will be doing just the opposite. It will be getting government out of the marriage business.
 
Tue
27
Jan

ONE FOR THE OKLAHOMA HISTORY BOOK

Back in 2000, the StateMuseum of History, now the Oklahoma History Center, presented a dramatic exhibit of nearly life-sized photos of African Americans living and working in towns they founded in Indian Territory and Oklahoma Territory before the state of Oklahoma was founded
 

 

Tue
27
Jan

A Word From The Superintendent

As the month of January comes to a close, there are a variety of activities taking place within Cordell Schools. While most of the nights are occupied with athletic events, other co-curricular events are  taking place as well.    
 
Tue
20
Jan

Washita County Museum News

We are continuing on this week with our series on Durwood Merrill. Durwood was an American League umpire who grew up in Cowden, and still has many family members here in Washita County. In 1971, Durwood was tired of his football coaching career. He had wondered for quite a while if he had what it took to become a major league baseball umpire. While watching a ball game on TV late in the fall of that year, the name and address of an umpiring school came on the TV. Durwood sent off his resume, not really expecting much to come of it.

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